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  • Previous COVID-19 Announcements

    Previous announcements and updates from UK Gov and ACRE
  • DT Forge

    DT Forge exists to promote good craftsmanship in a rich variety of materials, using traditional hand crafting techniques, supplemented by modern tooling and processes. Products range from original designs in high quality materials to artefacts made by sensitive recycling of iconic objects with the aim of extending their lifespan. "Making something out of the ordinary, out of the ordinary”
  • Memorial Hall and COVID-19

    Following Lockdown, Village and Community Halls were able to accommodate indoor sport and exercise, dancing classes and certain other performance-related activity from 25th July 2020.The Memorial Hall Management Committee is taking a steps to qualify the hall as being COVID-19 Secure as follows: We have conducted a Memorial Hall Risk Assessment and made it available to all users. We have cleaning, handwashing and hygiene procedures in line with UK Government guidance We have taken all reasonable steps to help hall users keep safe from COVID-19 We have taken all reasonable steps to help Hirers maintain Social Distancing when using the hall Where people cannot keep 2m apart we have advised Hirers on the mitigating actions they might take to manage transmission risk
  • VE Day 75 - Stay at Home Street Party - 8th May 2020

    Stay at Home Street Party - Decorate your House in Red, White & Blue and enjoy a picnic in your front Garden”.The village was bedecked in red, white and blue bunting (see also a short video taken by resident Charles Charlesworth on the Hampsthwaite Memorial Hall FaceBook page)Teas were prepared by the local coffee shop, Sophie's.With sandwiches, sausage roll, cream scone and Victoria sponge. One recipient later declared it to be “As good as tea at the Ritz”. A VE day quiz was also distributed with each tea.A group of volunteers distributed the teas, one came appropriately dressed in an outfit from the 1940s
  • Frank and Peggy Shuffe - Licensees at the Joiners Arms 1956-1977

    Frank Shuffe, the from 1956, was an English professional footballer who played as a right back for Bradford City and later became trainer at Valley Parade.On leaving football he became manager of the The Prospect Hotel at Ecckeshill, Bradford during October 1953 before moving on to become Landlord of the Joiner's Arms in 1956 Frank died at Harrogate Hospital on 7 February 1973 after a short illness aged 55. Peggy continued on with their son John, a keen sportsman, until she retired in 1978 and moved to live near friends in Scotland  
  • The 'Spanish Flu' - Hampsthwaite 1918

    Milly Hebblethwaite was  a delightful and diligent 14 year old pupil at Hampsthwaite school, who came from a growing family who lived in the Hollins.  The previous year the school had given her a prize for her excellent attendance.  She died of influenza on 10th November, 1918;  This was one day before the end of the ‘War to end wars,’ the first World war.[article by Angela Sansam - June 2020]
  • DTOnline

    DT Online aims to provide, free at the point of use, a substantive resource base generated by teachers and educationalists to support Design and Technology education.The project is supported by the enterprises listed below.
  • UCI Road World Cycling Championships Come Through Hampsthwaite 2019

    Click on the NYCC Interactive Map below to see details of all road closures, parking restrictions, diversions and race timings. Briefly for Hampsthwaite they are as follows:Tuesday 24th Sept. 2019 for High Street and Elton Lane : No Parking: 23 Sep 22:00 - 24 Sep 18:30 - Road closed:  08:30 - 17:30 Mens U23 Individual Time Trial due to come through between 10:35 and 12:18 Women Elite Individual Time Trial due to come through between15:07 and 16:35 Saturday 28th Sept. 2019 for High Street and Elton Lane : No Parking: 27 Sep 22:00 - 28 Sep 16:00 - Road closed: 28 Sep 13:40 - 15:00 Publicity Caravan - leaves Ripon at 12.34 so due here around 1.10pm Women Elite Road Race due to come through between14.29 and 14.47 Click on the FanZone image to see full details of the many attractions on Harrogate centre during race week
  • Plans, Layouts and Resources

    Hampsthwaite Memorial Hall can provide facilities and resources for most events and has a good car park with marked spaces for over 50 cars. There is a well-equipped kitchen and catering area with dishwasher, water-heater, micro-wave, Rangemaster Pro induction cooker and ample supplies of crockery, glassware and cutlery. Adjacent to the Kitchen is a Servery with hatchways through to both the Main Hall and Dining Room (or small hall) which can be used as a bar. The Memorial Hall is licenced to sell alcohol. The Main Hall includes a well-equipped stage area and Green Room at one end, with P.A. system, both rear and front projection facilities for DVD, Blu-ray or data, ample stage-lighting, star-cloth, a mirror ball, and can be rigged with a ceiling canopy if needed. The Main Hall can open out into the adjacent Sun Lounge to accommodate larger numbers or as a bar area. The Dining Room, or small hall, is used for meetings, for groups, to place a buffet for example, or as another alternative bar area. There are ample chairs to furnish each of the spaces using either rectangular or circular tables. Table cloths and chair covers are available on request.
  • George Frederick Grimshaw - biography

    George Frederick Grimshaw 20th October 1914 - 17th June 1940
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Thomas a'Becket Walk

Link to 426

(click photo to enlarge)

This modern development of 19 houses occupies land which formerly had an agricultural use. In 1924 it was part of 27 acres of such land purchased by Dearlove Addyman and formed part of "Village Farm" which he had occupied as a tenant farmer for some years previously (click here to read about previous owners). Over the years a thriving business of animal slaughter developed on the site and an abattoir stood on part of the land until a few years ago (click here to read about the abattoir).

In 1994 the site was sold to Nidderdale Quality Foods Ltd. An application for planning consent to allow the construction of residential property was made in 1997 and refused.

A further such application was lodged in August 2000 seeking outline consent for housing construction. The application was made against a background of regular complaints from villagers concerning nuisances of noise, smells, traffic congestion etc. arising from the use of the site. The application drew attention to the fact that, over the years, increasing UK and EEC regulations and the practical problems arising on the site had made difficult the continuing economic viability of the industry while retaining residential amenity. The site was no longer suitable for the business. Discussions had recognised the need to raise capital from residential development to fund the relocation of the business. Changes in the value of the housing market meant that a smaller such development could now finance such a change. It was suggested that the application if granted would result in an enhancement of the Conservation Area. The applicants envisaged the construction of 18 houses of which 3 could be "affordable" properties.

The Planning Officer recognised that the proposal might be an acceptable solution to a long standing problem but it soon became clear that a number of issues needed to be resolved. The Environment Agency expressed the view that the proposal might be acceptable provided steps were taken to prevent an increase in the risk of flooding to the site (the site lies in the flood plain of the River Nidd). The Heritage Officer was of the view that an archaeological survey was necessary in view of the historic nature of the area (part of an ancient Roman route). Local residents expressed their own concerns about flooding, increased traffic, loss of a village workplace, undue enlargement of the existing village, types and sizes of dwellings contemplated, etc., etc. The Harrogate Council's file discloses a great deal of correspondence on these matters.

The planning application was listed for consideration on 7th December 2000 but on the day before the hearing an objection was received from the Environment Agency citing renewed concerns about flood risks. Although the applicants had been led to believe that the risk was low, heavy rains in the proceeding days had resulted in the site being flooded! The application was deferred for further investigation. A solution was proposed involving raising the ground height of the dwellings and the creation of a large excavated "compensation area" between the position of any housing and the river. Next month the application was, on the recommendation of the planning officer, again deferred but on the basis that the Head of Planning Services was authorised to approve the application subject to numerous conditions designed to meet all the concerns identified including arrangements for securing the future maintenance of the compensation area.

Much work was obviously done thereafter to meet the conditions and, on the 24th April 2002, an application for full planning consent was lodged by new owners and proposed builders Charles Church North East of Newton Aycliffe Co. Durham. The architects for the project were Carey Nieman of Leeds.

The application was accompanied by a detailed contextual study undertaken to identify the design characteristics, spatial qualities and built form of Hampsthwaite village. Nevertheless, the application provoked renewed concerns as to the need for a clearer scheme for landscaping, flood protection measures, surface water disposal, the high value and number of dwellings proposed, the intrusive nature of the envisaged housing in the landscape, etc., etc. The County Council reported on its archaeological evaluation saying that the remains of medieval open field systems formed part of the historic landscape around the village; there were earthwork remains of ridge and furrow and an earthwork bank might possibly follow that of the projected course of the Roman road. The report concluded that "the preservation in situ of these remains is the preferred option" and that building plot 19 "will directly affect these earthworks". In June 2002 the Parish council reported on the result of a public meeting held the previous week and identified the concerns of the villagers then expressed (which had repeated many known objections and added comments about preserving an ancient 300 year-old Hawthorn hedge and a large Sycamore tree on the site) and added its own comments about the need to manage flood/drainage problems. The Conservation Officer did not support the application and made a number of detailed criticisms of the proposed design. The Environmental Health Officer and Yorkshire Water reiterated earlier concerns about potential nuisance from increased use of the nearby sewage pumping station. By October it was apparent to the developers that outstanding issues would not be resolved in time for the intended meeting of the planning committee in November. Eventually, in February 2003 the planning committee authorised the Head of Planning Services to approve the application subject to 33 conditions suggested by the planning officer and, after more detailed negotiations, those conditions were deemed to be met with the result that the house we see today were constructed.

Since the construction of the estate a review of the Conservation Area has been carried out by the Council which comments . . . "There is a new housing expansion in St Thomas a Becket Walk of mainly detached houses on the site of a former cattle slaughterhouse. Whilst the houses have been constructed in stone, along the river valley, once they have aged and weathered should eventually merge into the landscape. However, they would, in the meantime, benefit from further screening with additional tree planting..".

Click here to go to the interactive map where you may click on individual properties to reveal photos of them.

Thomas a'Becket Walk

(click photo to enlarge)

Link to 426