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  • Memorial Photos

    General repository for photos used in Preserving Our Past
  • Residents

    General Repository for photos and other data relatiing to Hampsthwaite Residents
  • PLOT No. ## Felliscliffe Chapel-of-Ease

    Approximate location of Plot at the Felliscliffe Chapel of Ease, Kettlesing, HG3 2LB
  • Hampsthwaite Village Room and COVID-19

    The Village Room Committee has taken steps to qualify the hall as being COVID-19 Secure as follows: We have conducted a Village Room Risk Assessment and made it available to all users. We have cleaning, handwashing and hygiene procedures in line with UK Government guidance We have taken all reasonable steps to help hall users keep safe from COVID-19 We have taken all reasonable steps to help Hirers maintain Social Distancing when using the Village Room Where people cannot keep 2m apart we have advised Hirers on the mitigating actions they might take to manage transmission risk
  • Hampsthwaite Community Room and COVID-19

    The Community Room Committee has taken steps to qualify the hall as being COVID-19 Secure as follows: We have conducted a Community Room Risk Assessment and made it available to all users. We have cleaning, handwashing and hygiene procedures in line with UK Government guidance We have taken all reasonable steps to help hall users keep safe from COVID-19 We have taken all reasonable steps to help Hirers maintain Social Distancing when using the  Community Room Where people cannot keep 2m apart we have advised Hirers on the mitigating actions they might take to manage transmission risk
  • Preserving Our Past

    The churchyard of St Thomas a'Beckett, and its Chapel-of-Ease at Felliscliffe hold within them a wealth of local heritage via their Memorial Inscriptions and Burial Records. Why so many infant deaths, what was happening in society at the time of burial, was there a war or an illness affecting the population? How many local families are represented there and are there any well known names - or not so well known but with an interesting story attached? Is the design of the Memorial interesting in terms of its art work or the language used?This section of our website aims to list photographs of all Memorials, together with their Inscriptions and Church Records so that such questions may be answered by browsing or searching both now and in the foreseeable future - even long after some inscriptions may have faded beyond readability.
  • Bell

    Plot No. 3043 John Bell 1764 -1833 Plot No. 3148 William Bell 1811-1879Elizabeth Bell 1811 - 1860 Plot No. 3148 Maria Bell 1845 -1845Hannah Bell 1846 - 1860 Click on images to enlarge  Inscription  Inscription  Inscription Herelieth the body of JohnBell of Birstwith who de-parted this life the 1st of September 1833 aged69 years INLOVING MEMORYOFWILLIAM BELLBORN 3RD JUNE 1811,DIED 4TH JULY 1879ALSOELIZABETH,WIFE OF THE ABOVE,BORN 14TH JANY 1811,DIED 10TH MARCH 1860 IN LOVING MEMORYOF MARIA BELLBORN 3RD FEBY 1845DIED 11TH FEBY 1845ALSOHANNAH BELL BORN 18TH AUG 1846DIED 16TH JANY 1860
  • Lupton

    Plot No. 109 Ann Lupton  1784 - 1858 Plot No. 110 William Lupton 1775  - 1859 Click on images to enlarge Inscription Inscription IN MEMORY OFANN LUPTONof Hampsthwaitewho Died December 3rd 1858Aged 74 Years. In Memory ofWILLIAM LUPTON OF HAMPSTHWAITEWHO DIED JULY 18TH 1859AGED 84 YEARSLo! the prisoner is releasedLightened of his fleshly loadWhere the weary are at restHe is gather’d in to God!Lo! the pain of life is past,All his warfare now is o’er.Death and hell behind are cast,Grief and suffering are no more.
  • Watson

    Plot No. 61 Mary Hannah Watson 1863 -1931George Watson 1763 - 1846Henry Watson 1892 -1963Charles Watson 1893 -1918William Watson 1890 - 1891 Plot No. 81 Thomas Watson 1825 -1909Sarah Watson 1824 - 1899 Click on images to enlarge Inscription Inscription IN LOVING MEMORY OFMARY HANNAH WATSONDIED 1931 AGE 68ALSO HER HUSBANDGEORGEDIED 1946 AGE 83AND THEIR SONSHENRYDIED 27TH JAN.1963 AGE 71CHARLESDIED 23RD OCT. 1918 AGE 25WILLIAMDIED 14TH APR. 1891 AGE 1 In Loving Memory oTHOMAS WATSONOF FELLISCLIFFEWHO DIED MARCH 10TH 1909IN HIS 78TH YEARALSO OF SARAH WIFE OFTHE ABOVE WHO DIED DECEMBER 4TH 1899IN HER 75TH YEAR"SWEET REST AT LAST"
  • Smith

    Plot No. 3001 Edward Smith 1769 -1869Sarah Smith 1782 -1868Sarah Smith 1824 -1844 Click on images to enlarge Inscription  Thy will be doneSACREDTO THE MEMORY OFEDWARD SMITH,OF FELLISCLIFFE WHO DIED NOVEMBER 29th 1869AGED 100 YEARSALSO 6 FEET TO THE WEST SIDE OF THIS STONELIETH SARAH, THE WIFEOF THE ABOVE WHO DIED DECEMBER 3rd 1868AGED 86 YEARSALSO SARAH, DAUGHTEROF THE ABOVE WHO DIED MAY 24th 1844AGED 20 YEARS
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George Frederick Grimshaw - biography

George Frederick Grimshaw 
20th October 1914 - 17th June 1940

George Frederick Grimshaw
George Frederick Grimshaw
George F Grimshaw was born on 20th October 1914 at Horsefair, a small street in the centre of Wetherby (LS22 6JG).

He was the son of Thomas and Mary Grimshaw, later of 21a Skipton Road, Harrogate as indicated on the Birth Certficate copy below. The Certified Copy is dated 1934, when George would have been 20, and may have been required as proof of age following the introduction of National Insurance in 1920 and its further development in 1934
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Inscription reads:-  Hgte& District Amateur Cricket  League  2nd Div Bowling Prize GF Grimshaw 1933 - click for full size image
Inscription reads:- Hgte& District Amateur Cricket League 2nd Div Bowling Prize GF Grimshaw 1933


Their home at 21A and later 19 Skipton Rd was opposite Grove House, originally the Home of Samson Fox, famous engineer, mill owner and entrepreneur, and was where the Fire Station now stands.

Both George and his brother Douglas both attended Grove Road School - so they had probably less than a hundred yards walk to school!

George passed his “scholarship” to Harrogate Grammar School where he is commemorated on one of the school Rolls of Honour. He was evidently good at cricket since at the age of 18, he was awarded this (4 1/2 ins high) solid silver trophy.

George married Mary Kathleen Haxby in autumn1937 in the Harrogate area. Mary was born on 08 Dec 1908 in Knaresborough and died on 09 Dec 1981 in Ynys Mon, Anglesey, Wales. She was a younger sister of William Haxby, commemorated on the Hampsthwaite War Memorial, who was killed in action1917, and daughter of William ‘Saddler’ Haxby, all of ‘Ashville’ on Church Lane.

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George and Mary came to live in Hampsthwaite. The photos opposite show George just after joining the army outside what is believed to be their bungalow on Hollins Lane “the last one on the Harrogate road out on the right hand side”.

George Died 17th June 1940 as a result of enemy action, on board the RMS Lancastria. whilst serving in the Royal Engineers of the British Army.

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Dunkirk Memorial

The British Commonwealth War Graves Memorial Registration Report (GRR), reads:

GRIMSHAW, Dvr. George Frederick, 2189393. 116 Road Constr. Coy, Royal Engineers; lost in s.s. Lancastria (Liverpool). 17th June, 1940. Age 25. Son of William and Mary Grimshaw; husband of Mary K Grimshaw, of Hampsthwaite, Yorkshire.
 
His memorial marker is at the Dunkirk Memorial Dunkirk (Dunquerque), Departement du Nord, Nord—Pas—de—Calais, France, Plot: Column 29.

See: https://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/2501692/grimshaw,-george-frederick/

Link to https://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/2501692/grimshaw,-george-frederick/
Link to http://www.hampsthwaite.org.uk/get.html?_Action=GetImage&_Key=Data9903&_Id=456&_DontCache=1592392022&TinyMCE=1&_Extension=.jpg
Link to https://archive.cloud.cwgc.org/archive/doc/doc2909453.JPG
The Lancastria was sunk on 17 June 1940 off the French port of St. Nazaire while taking part in Operation Ariel, the evacuation of British nationals and troops from France, two weeks after the Dunkirk evacuation. By the mid-afternoon of 17 June she had embarked an unknown number (estimates range from 4,000 up to 9,000).

At 15:50 Lancastria was hit by three, or possibly four bombs dropped by a Junkers Ju 88 bomber aircraft from Kampfgeschwader 30, and within 20 minutes, the 16,243-ton luxury liner sank. Many of its life boats were either damaged or could not be launched.  Many of those in the water drowned because there were insufficient life jackets, or died from hypothermia, or were choked by fuel oil. Meanwhile, German aircraft began strafing survivors in the water and dropped flares into the floating oil.

The sinking is the worst single disaster in British maritime history, and claimed more victims than the sinking of the Titanic and Lusitania combined. It is also the largest single loss of life for British forces in the whole of World War 2.

 Many families of the dead knew only that they died with the British Expeditionary Force (BEF); the death toll accounted for roughly a third of the total losses of the BEF in France.

The original author is Odin Rosenvinge. - https://flickr.com/photos/tom1231/355486926/sizes/l/in/photostream/, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=7033677
The original author is Odin Rosenvinge. - https://flickr.com/photos/tom1231/355486926/sizes/l/in/photostream/, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=7033677


Imperial War Museum Oral History
Imperial War Museum - Oral History
Imperial War Museum - Oral History
Harry Higton was a survivor of the sinking of the Lancastria. He was a British NCO served with 2/5th and 1/5th Bns Sherwood Foresters in GB and France, 1939-1943; aboard Lancastria when sunk off St Nazaire, 17/Jun/1940; served with 2/5th Bn Sherwood Foresters in North Africa, 1943; POW in Italy and Germany, 1943-1945 His account of the sinking can be listened to using the link below.

 Meet "The First Hero Of The SAS" Paperback – 30 Nov. 2017 by David Dalrymple (Author)
Meet "The First Hero Of The SAS" Paperback – 30 Nov. 2017 by David Dalrymple (Author)
REEL 4 Continues:
moved to Everaux near Paris; description of refugees; problem of German air attacks; role in support of 1/5th Bn Sherwood Foresters; morale; preparations for evacuation; conditions on evacuation beach near St Nazaire; organisation of evacuation. Aspects of sinking of Lancastria, 17/Jun/1940: boarded Lancastria and description of conditions aboard ship; food; accommodation; description of German air attack on Lancastria and escape from sinking ship; conditions in sea; question of fear; question of German machine gun fire on men in water; problem of oil on water and danger of fire; story of being rescued by French rowing boat.

Harry Higton was a friend of David Dalrymple and his account of the sinking also appears in a book David has written about another soldier, “Meet the First Hero of The SAS”- George Daniels.
George Frederick Grimshaw - biography

George Frederick Grimshaw 
20th October 1914 - 17th June 1940

George Frederick Grimshaw
George Frederick Grimshaw