Recent articles

  • VE Day 75 – Friday 8th May 2020

    Our Memorial Hall was built to honour the fallen in two world wars and give thanks to those who returned. It is appropriate therefore that we play our full part in the national celebrations and village activities planned for May Day Bank Holiday 2020 - moved to Friday 8th May for this purpose.Our afternoon begins with a what is hoped will be a re-enactment of what is believed to have been a visit to Metcalfe’s shop by ‘Monty’ which will continue on to The Joiners where there will be renditions of the Last Post and The Battle’s O’er following by a Toast to the Heroes as per the suggested national programme, with the Ukulele Band providing additional entertainment during the afternoon. The evening ends with a 40's Dance Party at the Memorial Hall.
  • UCI Road World Cycling Championships Come Through Hampsthwaite 2019

    Click on the NYCC Interactive Map below to see details of all road closures, parking restrictions, diversions and race timings. Briefly for Hampsthwaite they are as follows:Tuesday 24th Sept. 2019 for High Street and Elton Lane : No Parking: 23 Sep 22:00 - 24 Sep 18:30 - Road closed:  08:30 - 17:30 Mens U23 Individual Time Trial due to come through between 10:35 and 12:18 Women Elite Individual Time Trial due to come through between15:07 and 16:35 Saturday 28th Sept. 2019 for High Street and Elton Lane : No Parking: 27 Sep 22:00 - 28 Sep 16:00 - Road closed: 28 Sep 13:40 - 15:00 Publicity Caravan - leaves Ripon at 12.34 so due here around 1.10pm Women Elite Road Race due to come through between14.29 and 14.47 Click on the FanZone image to see full details of the many attractions on Harrogate centre during race week
  • Plans, Layouts and Resources

    Hampsthwaite Memorial Hall can provide facilities and resources for most events and has a good car park with marked spaces for over 50 cars. There is a well-equipped kitchen and catering area with dishwasher, water-heater, micro-wave, Rangemaster Pro induction cooker and ample supplies of crockery, glassware and cutlery. Adjacent to the Kitchen is a Servery with hatchways through to both the Main Hall and Dining Room (or small hall) which can be used as a bar. The Memorial Hall is licenced to sell alcohol. The Main Hall includes a well-equipped stage area and Green Room at one end, with P.A. system, both rear and front projection facilities for DVD, Blu-ray or data, ample stage-lighting, star-cloth, a mirror ball, and can be rigged with a ceiling canopy if needed. The Main Hall can open out into the adjacent Sun Lounge to accommodate larger numbers or as a bar area. The Dining Room, or small hall, is used for meetings, for groups, to place a buffet for example, or as another alternative bar area. There are ample chairs to furnish each of the spaces using either rectangular or circular tables. Table cloths and chair covers are available on request.
  • George Frederick Grimshaw - biography

    George Frederick Grimshaw 20th October 1914 - 17th June 1940
  • Roman Roads in Yorkshire.

    Gazetteer by the Roman Roads Research AssociationCovering all of Britain’s Roman roads, the Gazetteer, when completed, will be the first survey of Britain’s Roman roads since Ivan Margary’s final edition of Roman Roads in Britain in 1973. We aim to provide an up to date evaluation of each Roman road and, since new discoveries are being made all the time this online resource gives us the flexibility to make amendments and additions.
  • Yoga for Health and Happiness

    Beginners’ 10 week course starts 29th April 2019 at Hampsthwaite Memorial Hall Monday 9:30am – 10:30am Course fee £60  Places limited For more info and to book, contact Sue Beever Mobile 07801 064819 Email suebeever@gmail.com
  • Hampsthwaite’s Dancing for Well-Being group on ITV

    A film featuring Dancing for Well-Being’s Hampsthwaite group will be shown on ITV’s Calendar North News at 6.00 p.m. on Friday 5th April.  From 1st April you can also see the film on the People’s Projects website – www.thepeoplesprojects.org.uk/projects/view/together-through-dance
  • Privacy and Cookies

    This privacy and cookies policy sets out how Hampsthwaite Village 2011 uses and protects any information that you may give Hampsthwaite Village 2011 when you use this website.
  • Sunnyside Cottage, Carpenter's Cottage and Croft View

    (click photo to enlarge)
  • Sunnyside Cottage, Carpenter's Cottage and Croft View - photo

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Saddler's Cottage

Link to 394

(click photo to enlarge)

This ancient structure gives a fascinating glimpse into the standard of dwelling-houses in past times. It can be detected,it is believed, on the earliest O.S. Map of 1853 and its appearance suggests an age going back well into the 18th century. The 1853 map (but not the Inclosure Map of 1771) shows a long line or terrace of such buildings of which this was the most southern and with, perhaps, 6 or 7 buildings in the row. It seems to be the sole survivor of a row of artisans' dwellings or workshops (or both!) and its cramped and crude proportions evoke vividly the rigours of life in earlier years.

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Its name reflects its occupation by (amongst others) William "Saddler" Haxby who lived and worked in Church Lane. The history of property transactions for Church Lane (click on Previous owners for that earlier history) reveals the purchase in 1918 of the nearby property of "Ashville" by Mr Haxby who was described in the deed as a saddler. The Haxby name crops up regularly in records of Hampsthwaite but this seems very obviously the same person as the occupant of Saddler's Cottage and we must assume that Ashville was his home and the Cottage his workshop. Annie Pawson (see Book One) said "In our schooldays the remains of Thackeray's cottage was a joiner's shop. 'Saddler' Haxby was the last to own the property. He was the oldest saddler in Yorkshire and, I think I'm right in saying, the third oldest in the whole of England."

A picture exists of Mr Haxby engaged in bell-ringing (three bells at once!) at the church.

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The cottage stands on land belonging to Swallow Cottage and it is assumed that it has been unoccupied since long before Swallow Cottage was built in the 1970s. William Grainge, in his history "Harrogate and the Forest of Knaresborough" published in 1871, says this of the site . . . . .

"It has been settled beyond the reach of reasonable doubt that Hampsthwaite was the original home of the family of Thackeray, which has been raised to high distinction by the talents of some of its members, but more particularly by the brilliant literary career of William Makepeace Thackeray, whose sudden death cast such a gloom over the world of letters near the close of the year 1863. The old hive from whence the swarms of Thackerays issued yet remains, opposite the vicarage. It consists of three distinct tenements, two storeys in height in front, but only about eight feet in height at the back. The northern gable, with a large projecting chimney, is a piece of excellent masonry, and is probably older than the side walls. The roof is covered with thatch. A day of renovation or rebuilding will come at no distant date, and when it does come we humbly petition the owner to spare the northern gable, and it will long serve as a memorial to mark the dwelling of the great-grandfather of William Makepeace Thackeray, the author of "Vanity Fair".

[Note that the petition failed to prevent the loss of the gable!]

The family from whence he sprang were of yeoman rank, owners of land which they cultivated with their own hands. Walter Thackeray, of Hampsthwaite, who died in 1618, had a son named Robert, which said Robert had a son named Thomas, born in 1628, who by his wife, Margaret, had a family of seven sons and two daughters. The sixth of these sons, named Elias, became rector of Hauxwell, and appears to have been the first of the family to rise to distinction. The fifth son, named Timothy, born in November, 1664, became parish clerk in his native village; he had a family of seven sons and four daughters Thomas, the eldest son, became head master of Harrow School in 1746; D.D. in 1747; and Archdeacon of Surrey in 1753. He was great-grandfather to the celebrated William Makepeace Thackeray, who died suddenly December 24th, 1863, at the early age of 53. He had, however, done enough to live in the memory of posterity.

To return to the Thackerays at home in their quiet nest in the forest village. Elias, the third son of Timothy, succeeded his father as parish clerk, and, on his decease, in July, 1725, Joseph, a younger brother, succeeded to the office, which he probably held until his death, on the 4th January, 1771, when his son, Thomas Thackeray, succeeded, and held the situation thirty-three years, closing his career in January, 1804, and was the last of the family who resided at Hampsthwaite . . . . .

. . . . .A brass plate, inserted in the face of an older altar tomb in the churchyard, bears the following inscription to his memory -

"Here lieth the body of Thomas Thackwray, of this town, son of Joseph Thackwray, clerk of this parish, who departed this life the 21st of January, 1804, aged 56.

Farewell, vain world, I've had enough of thee;
I'm careless, therefore, what thou say'st of me;
Thy smiles I court not, nor thy frowns do fear,
My cares are past, my bones lie quiet here;
What fault thou found'st in me take care to shun,
Look well at home, enough there's to be done."

Saddler's Cottage

(click photo to enlarge)

Link to 394