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  • Memorial Photos

    General repository for photos used in Preserving Our Past
  • Residents

    General Repository for photos and other data relatiing to Hampsthwaite Residents
  • PLOT No. ## Felliscliffe Chapel-of-Ease

    Approximate location of Plot at the Felliscliffe Chapel of Ease, Kettlesing, HG3 2LB
  • Hampsthwaite Village Room and COVID-19

    The Village Room Committee has taken steps to qualify the hall as being COVID-19 Secure as follows: We have conducted a Village Room Risk Assessment and made it available to all users. We have cleaning, handwashing and hygiene procedures in line with UK Government guidance We have taken all reasonable steps to help hall users keep safe from COVID-19 We have taken all reasonable steps to help Hirers maintain Social Distancing when using the Village Room Where people cannot keep 2m apart we have advised Hirers on the mitigating actions they might take to manage transmission risk
  • Hampsthwaite Community Room and COVID-19

    The Community Room Committee has taken steps to qualify the hall as being COVID-19 Secure as follows: We have conducted a Community Room Risk Assessment and made it available to all users. We have cleaning, handwashing and hygiene procedures in line with UK Government guidance We have taken all reasonable steps to help hall users keep safe from COVID-19 We have taken all reasonable steps to help Hirers maintain Social Distancing when using the  Community Room Where people cannot keep 2m apart we have advised Hirers on the mitigating actions they might take to manage transmission risk
  • Preserving Our Past

    The churchyard of St Thomas a'Beckett, and its Chapel-of-Ease at Felliscliffe hold within them a wealth of local heritage via their Memorial Inscriptions and Burial Records. Why so many infant deaths, what was happening in society at the time of burial, was there a war or an illness affecting the population? How many local families are represented there and are there any well known names - or not so well known but with an interesting story attached? Is the design of the Memorial interesting in terms of its art work or the language used?This section of our website aims to list photographs of all Memorials, together with their Inscriptions and Church Records so that such questions may be answered by browsing or searching both now and in the foreseeable future - even long after some inscriptions may have faded beyond readability.
  • Bell

    Plot No. 3043 John Bell 1764 -1833 Plot No. 3148 William Bell 1811-1879Elizabeth Bell 1811 - 1860 Plot No. 3148 Maria Bell 1845 -1845Hannah Bell 1846 - 1860 Click on images to enlarge  Inscription  Inscription  Inscription Herelieth the body of JohnBell of Birstwith who de-parted this life the 1st of September 1833 aged69 years INLOVING MEMORYOFWILLIAM BELLBORN 3RD JUNE 1811,DIED 4TH JULY 1879ALSOELIZABETH,WIFE OF THE ABOVE,BORN 14TH JANY 1811,DIED 10TH MARCH 1860 IN LOVING MEMORYOF MARIA BELLBORN 3RD FEBY 1845DIED 11TH FEBY 1845ALSOHANNAH BELL BORN 18TH AUG 1846DIED 16TH JANY 1860
  • Lupton

    Plot No. 109 Ann Lupton  1784 - 1858 Plot No. 110 William Lupton 1775  - 1859 Click on images to enlarge Inscription Inscription IN MEMORY OFANN LUPTONof Hampsthwaitewho Died December 3rd 1858Aged 74 Years. In Memory ofWILLIAM LUPTON OF HAMPSTHWAITEWHO DIED JULY 18TH 1859AGED 84 YEARSLo! the prisoner is releasedLightened of his fleshly loadWhere the weary are at restHe is gather’d in to God!Lo! the pain of life is past,All his warfare now is o’er.Death and hell behind are cast,Grief and suffering are no more.
  • Watson

    Plot No. 61 Mary Hannah Watson 1863 -1931George Watson 1763 - 1846Henry Watson 1892 -1963Charles Watson 1893 -1918William Watson 1890 - 1891 Plot No. 81 Thomas Watson 1825 -1909Sarah Watson 1824 - 1899 Click on images to enlarge Inscription Inscription IN LOVING MEMORY OFMARY HANNAH WATSONDIED 1931 AGE 68ALSO HER HUSBANDGEORGEDIED 1946 AGE 83AND THEIR SONSHENRYDIED 27TH JAN.1963 AGE 71CHARLESDIED 23RD OCT. 1918 AGE 25WILLIAMDIED 14TH APR. 1891 AGE 1 In Loving Memory oTHOMAS WATSONOF FELLISCLIFFEWHO DIED MARCH 10TH 1909IN HIS 78TH YEARALSO OF SARAH WIFE OFTHE ABOVE WHO DIED DECEMBER 4TH 1899IN HER 75TH YEAR"SWEET REST AT LAST"
  • Smith

    Plot No. 3001 Edward Smith 1769 -1869Sarah Smith 1782 -1868Sarah Smith 1824 -1844 Click on images to enlarge Inscription  Thy will be doneSACREDTO THE MEMORY OFEDWARD SMITH,OF FELLISCLIFFE WHO DIED NOVEMBER 29th 1869AGED 100 YEARSALSO 6 FEET TO THE WEST SIDE OF THIS STONELIETH SARAH, THE WIFEOF THE ABOVE WHO DIED DECEMBER 3rd 1868AGED 86 YEARSALSO SARAH, DAUGHTEROF THE ABOVE WHO DIED MAY 24th 1844AGED 20 YEARS
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The Yorkshire Roman Roads Project

Link to http://www.romanroads.org/yorkshireproject.html

In the Historic county of Yorkshire, there are an estimated 1060 miles of Roman road, possibly more, of which about 480 are known with reasonable certainty (45%), making the picture in Yorkshire fairly typical.

Given that Yorkshire has a wide variety of topography that is fairly representative of all the kinds of terrain through which Roman roads were built in Britain and therefore representative of the variations in planning and construction, it makes an ideal starting point for a study of Britain’s Roman roads.


Roman Road Excavation

Town Hall, Ripley, Tuesday 7th April and Thursday 9th April, both at 8pm.

Mike Haken, Chairman of the Roman Roads Research Association, will talk about the excavations that took place last year in Hollybank Wood, Ripley, on part of the Roman road from Ilkley to Aldborough.

The work proved, finally, that the Roman road continued across the valley on precisely the same line as that of Hampsthwaite High Street and probably crossed the R. Nidd some 300m downstream from the current bridge, somewhere near Bridge End Farm.

The work also established that the local belief that Hollybank Lane had been on the course of the Roman road is almost certainly incorrect.

Mike will talk specifically about the features identified during the excavation, including an intriguing Roman cutting, a layby and even a genuine Roman pothole! He will also discuss the impact of this small excavation on our understanding of the Roman period in the area, and summarise the extent of our knowledge about the rest of the road from Hollybank Wood to Aldborough and highlight areas for further research.

The talks are being held upstairs to utilise the excellent AV facilities; places are limited and reservation is recommended, either on our website (www.romanroads.org) or by email to bookings@romanroads.org. Admission is £3 on the door.

(Click on images to enlarge)

Trench 1 - it isn't obvious but the far end of the trench is actually the layby - click for full size image
Trench 1 - it isn't obvious but the far end of the trench is actually the layby
Trench 3 - looking SE during excavation - click for full size image
Trench 3 - looking SE during excavation
Trench 3 - the pothole - the repair has survived and the surface around it has long gone! - click for full size image
Trench 3 - the pothole - the repair has survived and the surface around it has long gone!
Link to https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLZA0NFEx4cMLdwbt2pQDJyp7tpRkr8RFl
Hollybank Wood Roman Road Excavation

On Sunday 30th March 2014 tours of a Roman road excavation in Hollybank Wood were given by local archaeologists. The site in Hollybank Wood (owned by Sir Thomas Ingilby) is about a mile by foot from Ripley, North Yorkshire. The road once ran between Alborough and Ilkley.

Click HERE, on the image or the heading to view YouTube videos taken at the time




Link to http://roadsofromanbritain.org/gazetteer/yorkshire/rr720b.html

Gazetteer by the Roman Roads Research Association

Covering all of Britain’s Roman roads, the Gazetteer, when completed, will be the first survey of Britain’s Roman roads since Ivan Margary’s final edition of Roman Roads in Britain in 1973. We aim to provide an up to date evaluation of each Roman road and, since new discoveries are being made all the time this online resource gives us the flexibility to make amendments and additions.
The Yorkshire Roman Roads Project

In the Historic county of Yorkshire, there are an estimated 1060 miles of Roman road, possibly more, of which about 480 are known with reasonable certainty (45%), making the picture in Yorkshire fairly typical.

Given that Yorkshire has a wide variety of topography that is fairly representative of all the kinds of terrain through which Roman roads were built in Britain and therefore representative of the variations in planning and construction, it makes an ideal starting point for a study of Britain’s Roman roads.

Link to http://www.romanroads.org/yorkshireproject.html