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  • Memorial Photos

    General repository for photos used in Preserving Our Past
  • Residents

    General Repository for photos and other data relatiing to Hampsthwaite Residents
  • PLOT No. ## Felliscliffe Chapel-of-Ease

    Approximate location of Plot at the Felliscliffe Chapel of Ease, Kettlesing, HG3 2LB
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    The Village Room Committee has taken steps to qualify the hall as being COVID-19 Secure as follows: We have conducted a Village Room Risk Assessment and made it available to all users. We have cleaning, handwashing and hygiene procedures in line with UK Government guidance We have taken all reasonable steps to help hall users keep safe from COVID-19 We have taken all reasonable steps to help Hirers maintain Social Distancing when using the Village Room Where people cannot keep 2m apart we have advised Hirers on the mitigating actions they might take to manage transmission risk
  • Hampsthwaite Community Room and COVID-19

    The Community Room Committee has taken steps to qualify the hall as being COVID-19 Secure as follows: We have conducted a Community Room Risk Assessment and made it available to all users. We have cleaning, handwashing and hygiene procedures in line with UK Government guidance We have taken all reasonable steps to help hall users keep safe from COVID-19 We have taken all reasonable steps to help Hirers maintain Social Distancing when using the  Community Room Where people cannot keep 2m apart we have advised Hirers on the mitigating actions they might take to manage transmission risk
  • Preserving Our Past

    The churchyard of St Thomas a'Beckett, and its Chapel-of-Ease at Felliscliffe hold within them a wealth of local heritage via their Memorial Inscriptions and Burial Records. Why so many infant deaths, what was happening in society at the time of burial, was there a war or an illness affecting the population? How many local families are represented there and are there any well known names - or not so well known but with an interesting story attached? Is the design of the Memorial interesting in terms of its art work or the language used?This section of our website aims to list photographs of all Memorials, together with their Inscriptions and Church Records so that such questions may be answered by browsing or searching both now and in the foreseeable future - even long after some inscriptions may have faded beyond readability.
  • Bell

    Plot No. 3043 John Bell 1764 -1833 Plot No. 3148 William Bell 1811-1879Elizabeth Bell 1811 - 1860 Plot No. 3148 Maria Bell 1845 -1845Hannah Bell 1846 - 1860 Click on images to enlarge  Inscription  Inscription  Inscription Herelieth the body of JohnBell of Birstwith who de-parted this life the 1st of September 1833 aged69 years INLOVING MEMORYOFWILLIAM BELLBORN 3RD JUNE 1811,DIED 4TH JULY 1879ALSOELIZABETH,WIFE OF THE ABOVE,BORN 14TH JANY 1811,DIED 10TH MARCH 1860 IN LOVING MEMORYOF MARIA BELLBORN 3RD FEBY 1845DIED 11TH FEBY 1845ALSOHANNAH BELL BORN 18TH AUG 1846DIED 16TH JANY 1860
  • Lupton

    Plot No. 109 Ann Lupton  1784 - 1858 Plot No. 110 William Lupton 1775  - 1859 Click on images to enlarge Inscription Inscription IN MEMORY OFANN LUPTONof Hampsthwaitewho Died December 3rd 1858Aged 74 Years. In Memory ofWILLIAM LUPTON OF HAMPSTHWAITEWHO DIED JULY 18TH 1859AGED 84 YEARSLo! the prisoner is releasedLightened of his fleshly loadWhere the weary are at restHe is gather’d in to God!Lo! the pain of life is past,All his warfare now is o’er.Death and hell behind are cast,Grief and suffering are no more.
  • Watson

    Plot No. 61 Mary Hannah Watson 1863 -1931George Watson 1763 - 1846Henry Watson 1892 -1963Charles Watson 1893 -1918William Watson 1890 - 1891 Plot No. 81 Thomas Watson 1825 -1909Sarah Watson 1824 - 1899 Click on images to enlarge Inscription Inscription IN LOVING MEMORY OFMARY HANNAH WATSONDIED 1931 AGE 68ALSO HER HUSBANDGEORGEDIED 1946 AGE 83AND THEIR SONSHENRYDIED 27TH JAN.1963 AGE 71CHARLESDIED 23RD OCT. 1918 AGE 25WILLIAMDIED 14TH APR. 1891 AGE 1 In Loving Memory oTHOMAS WATSONOF FELLISCLIFFEWHO DIED MARCH 10TH 1909IN HIS 78TH YEARALSO OF SARAH WIFE OFTHE ABOVE WHO DIED DECEMBER 4TH 1899IN HER 75TH YEAR"SWEET REST AT LAST"
  • Smith

    Plot No. 3001 Edward Smith 1769 -1869Sarah Smith 1782 -1868Sarah Smith 1824 -1844 Click on images to enlarge Inscription  Thy will be doneSACREDTO THE MEMORY OFEDWARD SMITH,OF FELLISCLIFFE WHO DIED NOVEMBER 29th 1869AGED 100 YEARSALSO 6 FEET TO THE WEST SIDE OF THIS STONELIETH SARAH, THE WIFEOF THE ABOVE WHO DIED DECEMBER 3rd 1868AGED 86 YEARSALSO SARAH, DAUGHTEROF THE ABOVE WHO DIED MAY 24th 1844AGED 20 YEARS
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The Hampsthwaite Church Turret Clock - by Robert Lloyd

Index

 The Hampsthwaite Church clock was 100 years old on the 12th April 2012.

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The commemorative plaque reads –


TO THE GLORY OF GOD AND IN MEMORY OF JOHN SWALE WHO WAS BORN IN THIS VILLAGE ON 13TH NOVEMBER 1843 AND DIED IN MANCHESTER ON THE 2ND OCTOBER 1909
THE CLOCK WAS PLACED IN THIS TOWER BY HIS WIDOW MARY ELLEN SWALE AND WAS DEDICATED BY THE LORD BISHOP OF RICHMOND 12TH APRIL 1912

Church birth records show that John Swale was baptised on Sunday 31st December 1843 to parents Richard and Ann Swale. Richard and many in the family were Nidderdale weavers.


Known as turret clocks, or sometimes tower clocks, these clocks are usually seen only by those who wind them. The following is a list of Hampsthwaite Church clock winders since 1912 as recorded on the clock case door.


Clock winders name - as listed on the clock case pendulum doorStart dateYears Wound
GL191222
Ken Collier19341
George Christopher Ashby193525
George Thomas Ashby196022
Dennis Watson22nd May 19825
Robert Lloyd28th February 198725 to date
Chris Hardcastle1987/8824 to date
Howard Cooper1987/88 to 200820

“As winders we have welcomed many visitors over the years with over sixty visitors marking their names on the clock case door. A great tradition stretching back over the century.”

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Up the Tower

We enter a low door at the bottom of the tower and there in the cramped entrance an old stone spiral staircase winds its way upwards out of our sight. The steps are worn and uneven, narrow slit windows at every turn let in much-needed light, and it's rather cool and a bit dusty. An odd cobweb or two adds to the feeling that not many people pass this way.

Above us we can now just make out the muffled sound of the clock ticking, a steady deep clunk every second, like the sound of a very old grandfather clock.

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In the Clock Room

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Moving up the spiral staircase, we come to the clock room door which has a simple bolt key. Lit by an old leaded south window, we see against a wall an old wood and glass case, locked by a small cabinet key. The tick is now much louder and emanates from inside. Opening the wooden clock case, we now see the clock itself: an iron frame filled with gear wheels. At the back is the top of the pendulum swinging from side to side.

The clock was built by John Smith and Sons in 1912. John Smith began his own business in 1856 and it flourished in Derby during the 19th century industrial revolution, as one of the principle companies making flatbed turret clocks installed in churches, town halls and hospitals.

Annual maintenance has been carried out since 16th June 1947 by William Potts & Sons Limited of Guildford Street, Leeds, who joined the Smiths of Derby Group in 1935. William Potts & Sons had since 1833 been primarily concerned with domestic timepieces. The company gradually expanded into the manufacture and repair of public clocks.

The clock mechanism is properly known as a ‘movement’ and is based on a very old design. Right in the front of the movement is the brass clock dial used to check and set the time – it has only one hand. A rod runs from immediately above the brass dial up to the ceiling, turns through 90 degrees to a horizontal rod, which then links directly through a set of gears to the clock face on the outside of the tower. These gears, known as the ‘motion work’, are situated inside the tower and behind the clock face. They reduce the one-turn per hour of the minute hand into one turn in twelve hours of the hour hand. The motion work connects to the hands outside with a tube which runs through a hole in the tower wall which is very thick - about four feet! Clock faces such as these are made from copper sheet.

In the clock case movement, there are three winding drums with a thin braded wire extending upwards over pulleys and across the ceiling to the opposite corner of the clock room. These wires then plunge down through a hole to three separate heavy cylindrical weights hanging from them. The largest, for the hour chime, is about three feet tall and a foot in diameter. Fortunately, some guards around the holes protect the unwary visitor from falling in. These weights provide the driving power for the clock pendulum and for the striking of the bells. The smallest centre weight provides driving power, through the middle winding drum in the clock case movement, for the pendulum; the weight on the right is connected to the left winding drum, which drives the two quarter hour bells. The left (heaviest) weight is connected to the right winding drum and operates the single hour bell.

Three thin solid wires extend from the clock case to the ceiling, going directly up to the belfry where they operate the hammers to strike the three bells used by the clock: two quarter hour bells and one hour bell. The hour chime is triggered by little pillars placed into the large hour cog on the right hand side of the movement and the quarter hour chimes are triggered by little pillars placed into the large quarter hour cog on the left side of the movement.

Our flatbed turret clock keeps very good time. It runs a few seconds fast over most of the year and a few seconds slow when the outside temperature is above 20 degrees Celsius. To adjust the clock (speed up or slow down) small weights are added or subtracted from the top of the pendulum. These effectively change the centre of gravity of the pendulum and change the period of swing. The weight adjustment on the pendulum and the weekly check following winding, keeps the clock in very good time.

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In the Belfry

Proceeding further up the stone tower staircase, we open another door and hear the outside wind; a reminder that we are now getting near the top of the tower. In the belfry, louvres are used instead of windows, which are open slats allowing the sound to escape whilst keeping the rain out. There are six bells in the belfry: all brass, dull and green. Only three are used for the clock. Belfries can be very dangerous and noisy places if a bell suddenly starts to sound when the clock is striking. The note of the bell is very loud, deep and harsh: if you go up to the belfry, take extra care and be sure to cover up your ears. After the last stroke has sounded the bell goes on humming and humming, softer and softer until after a minute it has died away completely.

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The Hampsthwaite Church Turret Clock - by Robert Lloyd

Index

 The Hampsthwaite Church clock was 100 years old on the 12th April 2012.

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