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  • Memorial Photos

    General repository for photos used in Preserving Our Past
  • Residents

    General Repository for photos and other data relatiing to Hampsthwaite Residents
  • PLOT No. ## Felliscliffe Chapel-of-Ease

    Approximate location of Plot at the Felliscliffe Chapel of Ease, Kettlesing, HG3 2LB
  • Hampsthwaite Village Room and COVID-19

    The Village Room Committee has taken steps to qualify the hall as being COVID-19 Secure as follows: We have conducted a Village Room Risk Assessment and made it available to all users. We have cleaning, handwashing and hygiene procedures in line with UK Government guidance We have taken all reasonable steps to help hall users keep safe from COVID-19 We have taken all reasonable steps to help Hirers maintain Social Distancing when using the Village Room Where people cannot keep 2m apart we have advised Hirers on the mitigating actions they might take to manage transmission risk
  • Hampsthwaite Community Room and COVID-19

    The Community Room Committee has taken steps to qualify the hall as being COVID-19 Secure as follows: We have conducted a Community Room Risk Assessment and made it available to all users. We have cleaning, handwashing and hygiene procedures in line with UK Government guidance We have taken all reasonable steps to help hall users keep safe from COVID-19 We have taken all reasonable steps to help Hirers maintain Social Distancing when using the  Community Room Where people cannot keep 2m apart we have advised Hirers on the mitigating actions they might take to manage transmission risk
  • Preserving Our Past

    The churchyard of St Thomas a'Beckett, and its Chapel-of-Ease at Felliscliffe hold within them a wealth of local heritage via their Memorial Inscriptions and Burial Records. Why so many infant deaths, what was happening in society at the time of burial, was there a war or an illness affecting the population? How many local families are represented there and are there any well known names - or not so well known but with an interesting story attached? Is the design of the Memorial interesting in terms of its art work or the language used?This section of our website aims to list photographs of all Memorials, together with their Inscriptions and Church Records so that such questions may be answered by browsing or searching both now and in the foreseeable future - even long after some inscriptions may have faded beyond readability.
  • Bell

    Plot No. 3043 John Bell 1764 -1833 Plot No. 3148 William Bell 1811-1879Elizabeth Bell 1811 - 1860 Plot No. 3148 Maria Bell 1845 -1845Hannah Bell 1846 - 1860 Click on images to enlarge  Inscription  Inscription  Inscription Herelieth the body of JohnBell of Birstwith who de-parted this life the 1st of September 1833 aged69 years INLOVING MEMORYOFWILLIAM BELLBORN 3RD JUNE 1811,DIED 4TH JULY 1879ALSOELIZABETH,WIFE OF THE ABOVE,BORN 14TH JANY 1811,DIED 10TH MARCH 1860 IN LOVING MEMORYOF MARIA BELLBORN 3RD FEBY 1845DIED 11TH FEBY 1845ALSOHANNAH BELL BORN 18TH AUG 1846DIED 16TH JANY 1860
  • Lupton

    Plot No. 109 Ann Lupton  1784 - 1858 Plot No. 110 William Lupton 1775  - 1859 Click on images to enlarge Inscription Inscription IN MEMORY OFANN LUPTONof Hampsthwaitewho Died December 3rd 1858Aged 74 Years. In Memory ofWILLIAM LUPTON OF HAMPSTHWAITEWHO DIED JULY 18TH 1859AGED 84 YEARSLo! the prisoner is releasedLightened of his fleshly loadWhere the weary are at restHe is gather’d in to God!Lo! the pain of life is past,All his warfare now is o’er.Death and hell behind are cast,Grief and suffering are no more.
  • Watson

    Plot No. 61 Mary Hannah Watson 1863 -1931George Watson 1763 - 1846Henry Watson 1892 -1963Charles Watson 1893 -1918William Watson 1890 - 1891 Plot No. 81 Thomas Watson 1825 -1909Sarah Watson 1824 - 1899 Click on images to enlarge Inscription Inscription IN LOVING MEMORY OFMARY HANNAH WATSONDIED 1931 AGE 68ALSO HER HUSBANDGEORGEDIED 1946 AGE 83AND THEIR SONSHENRYDIED 27TH JAN.1963 AGE 71CHARLESDIED 23RD OCT. 1918 AGE 25WILLIAMDIED 14TH APR. 1891 AGE 1 In Loving Memory oTHOMAS WATSONOF FELLISCLIFFEWHO DIED MARCH 10TH 1909IN HIS 78TH YEARALSO OF SARAH WIFE OFTHE ABOVE WHO DIED DECEMBER 4TH 1899IN HER 75TH YEAR"SWEET REST AT LAST"
  • Smith

    Plot No. 3001 Edward Smith 1769 -1869Sarah Smith 1782 -1868Sarah Smith 1824 -1844 Click on images to enlarge Inscription  Thy will be doneSACREDTO THE MEMORY OFEDWARD SMITH,OF FELLISCLIFFE WHO DIED NOVEMBER 29th 1869AGED 100 YEARSALSO 6 FEET TO THE WEST SIDE OF THIS STONELIETH SARAH, THE WIFEOF THE ABOVE WHO DIED DECEMBER 3rd 1868AGED 86 YEARSALSO SARAH, DAUGHTEROF THE ABOVE WHO DIED MAY 24th 1844AGED 20 YEARS
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Thimbleby House

Link to 419

(click photo to enlarge)

If the date-stone (1755) built into this house is correct then the property is one of the oldest in Church Lane and probably contemporary with The Lamb Inn on the opposite side of the road. However, the several architectural styles evident in the photograph above strongly suggest a series of changes to the accommodation over the centuries. To the left of the picture we see what appears to be a double - fronted building with matching bay windows. Its style is consistent with a construction date early in Victorian times. The pediment over the central ground-floor window suggests the existence of a central doorway there when first built but the position of a chimney-breast above is odd (if both bays were constructed at the same time would not the chimney have been constructed on the right-hand gable wall?). There is a difference of proportion in the further section of building to the right of the second bay albeit it has a continuous roof with the rest of the building on the left. The further section of the house on the extreme right has a different and more antiquated roof altogether! That right-hand section, moreover, appears much older than the rest of the building. It may be that section which is the earliest and that the house has been extended southwards several times over the years.

Jeffrey's Map of 1770 is the earliest map we can presently refer to but it is crudely drawn and unreliable - it shows the parish church standing on this site! The first Ordnance Survey Map of 1853 shows some portion of the present house standing on the site but, again, is of scale difficult to reconcile with the present layout. The strongest evidence for the antiquity of the house (or parts of it) comes from the title deeds (as to which please click on previous owners).

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(click photo to enlarge)

This photograph from the early 20th century gives a glimpse of the handsome iron railings which once surmounted the front boundary wall - another victim, no doubt, of the drive for scrap metal material during the second world war! Another old photograph recently to hand gives an even better view of the railings (and a glimpse of an interesting conversation?).

Link to 420

(click photo to enlarge)

The house has had a number of distinguished occupants including several medical practitioners. In "Harrogate and the Forest of Knaresborough" published 1871, William Grainge says that it was the residence "of the late Mr. Bilton Josephus Wilson, who was an extensive landowner in this district, as well as the most munificent benefactor the parish of Hampsthwaite ever had. On the mother's side he was descended from the old and respectable family of Bilton, who have been landowners in the Forest of Knaresborough from a very early period . . . (his mother, Mary, married Joseph Wilson, later Vicar of Hampsthwaite, and Bilton was born in 1778. He married Sarah Simpson in 1836 and died, without issue, in 1866. Sarah died in 1869). . . Mr. Wilson was educated for the medical profession, but never practised, except among his poor neighbours, to whom (before a doctor settled in the village) he freely gave his advice and medicine. During the whole of his life he was remarkably benevolent and kind to the poor. He died somewhat suddenly, though slightly indisposed; he took tea as usual on the day of his death, when a fainting fit came on, from which he never recovered. When the school in Hampsthwaite was built he was the largest subscriber; and on the 25th of January, 1865, he transferred £1,500, new three per cent annuities, to four trustees, to form a perpetual endowment for the said school. By his will he bequeathed £100 to the Leeds Infirmary, £100 to the Harrogate Bath Hospital, £100 to the Church Missionary Society, £100 to the Society of Oddfellows at Hampsthwaite, and directed his executors to distribute his annual gift of £40 to the poor of the village, on the New Year's Day next after his decease" Annie Pawson (see Book One) refers to one of the last medical practitioners when she says . . . "There was a resident doctor in the village, Dr. Ashby, who died in 1913. My brother, born in 1912, was the last baby that he brought into the world. He lived at Thimbleby House, where the Bowen's are now (i.e. in 1981-followed by the Faber's and then the Hudson's), for years and years. He had a family born to him there. The house had a very wide back door and, if anyone went for medicine at night, the housekeeper would answer the door, ask what was wanted and pass the packet through a plate-sized hole in the door, which had a shutter that swivelled round. There were no free prescriptions then and the doctor would do little operations himself. He was marvellous."

Click here for census returns.

a Painting of the rear garden at Thimbleby House (by Susan Dugdale)
a Painting of the rear garden at Thimbleby House (by Susan Dugdale)
Thimbleby House

(click photo to enlarge)

Link to 419