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    Harrogate Borough Council is currently preparing a new Local Plan which will set out how the district should grow and develop to 2035.Previous iterations of their proposals and supporting documents are listed below with particular reference to their impact on Hampsthwaite. Link to HBC's Online Planning Application Information (opens in a new window) Click on Images or Headings to link to related articles
  • HARROGATE DISTRICT LOCAL PLAN

    Harrogate Borough Council is currently preparing a new Local Plan which will set out how the district should grow and develop to 2035.Previous iterations of their proposals and supporting documents are listed below with particular reference to their impact on Hampsthwaite. Link to HBC's Online Planning Application Information (opens in a new window) Link to Harrogate District Draft Local Plan Additional Sites consultation 14 July - 25 August 2017 (opens in a new window) Click on Images or Headings to link to related articles
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  • Barkers Family History

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  • BARKER Family History

    Descendants of John and Grace BarkerbyShaun L Wilson – February 2017 Barker families have resided in Hampsthwaite since the early seventeenth century and were extensive in the area during the nineteenth century. From the 1881 England Census for Hampsthwaite taken on 3rd April that year, Barker was the most popular name totalling 57 out of 457 people enumerated – 12.5% of those recorded living in Hampsthwaite at the time of that census. From the registers of Hampsthwaite parish, Barkers were in existence as early as 1610. The earliest Barker mentioned is John Barker, son of Peter who was baptised on 17th March that year.Where Hampsthwaite is mentioned in this article it refers to both village and parish. We will never know exactly where the early Barker’s dwelling houses were as they are not recorded in either the parish registers or on the early census returns, but it is assumed that they lived in the village or within the parish. It was not until the England Census of 1911 that full address details were given together with the total number of children born alive to the present marriage of the head of the family.
  • Tom Wright reflects upon the Barker family in Hampsthwaite

    As far as I can ascertain there were no Barkers in Hampsthwaite prior to the 18th century. The earliest reference I could find was to the marriage of John Barker, a tailor, to Ann Messenger (daughter of William Messenger) in the parish church sometime near the beginning of the 1700s. I don’t know from whence he originated.They had several children, as did all the Barkers, but I have only recorded my own direct ancestors. They were his son James Barker (1744) & Hannah Dousland; William Barker (1781) & Catherine Swale; John Barker (1810) & Mary Nutter; George Barker (1845) & Sarah ???  who themselves produced Rowland Barker and siblings. He married Eliza Jackson (from an even older family in Birstwith) and they were my maternal Grandparents.(See also and )
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The Old Parsonage

Link to 411

(click photo to enlarge)

Until its disposal by the church authorities in the 1970s (when a new Vicarage was built in its grounds) this was the residence of the Vicars of Hampsthwaite. It is, arguably, the most imposing domestic building in the village as became the social status of the incumbent of a benefice the boundaries of which once extended up the dale to include Birstwith, Darley, Menwith etc,. Yet Grainge in his history of "Harrogate and the forest of Knaresborough" published in 1871 only says of it that it is . . . . . "a large, plain, comfortable looking building, situate in its own grounds".

Now its merits are recognised by its Grade II listed status and it is described thus in the local Conservation Area document . . . "The Old Parsonage is . . . a three-storey building which has a form of a similar proportion to other buildings in the village on account of its length and lower second storey height, but the windows form a strong vertical emphasis The doorway is one of the few in the village that is emphasised with strong quoin detailing. The glazed central door in quoined ashlar surround has a projecting keystone. The building is mid/late eighteenth century with early/mid nineteenth century remodelling and extension and was restored c1980. It is of coursed, squared, gritstone and has a grey stone slate roof. The ground floor right window replaced a bow window removed with the rendering during restorations c1980."

The Grade II list describes it thus . . . . ."House. Mid-late C18 with early/mid C19 remodelling and extension and restoration c1980. Coarsed squared gritstone, grey slate roof. Plinth and stressed quoins. A 3-bay main block of 3 storeys and an additional 2-storey bay of the same height to left. Main block: glazed central door in quoined ashlar surround with projecting keystone. Flanking and first-floor sash windows with glazing bars, plain sills and lintels; 6-pane top-hung casements to attic storey. Bay to left: 15-pane sash with incised lintel to ground floor, tall 12-pane sash above. Hipped roof, 4 evenly-spaced banded stacks, 2 to ridge. The ground floor right window replaced a bay window removed with the rendering during restorations c1980. Interior: the entrance hall has 4-panel doors in architraves with paterae; shallow arch gives access to rear stairs of 2 straight flights with slender balusters and moulded handrail."

"A church inventory of 1743 describes the property thus.... "There is a Vicarage House Twenty four yards in Length and Ten in Breadth, also a Barn with a stable and cow House under the same Roof, in Length Fifteen Yards and Breadth five Yards, one Hen House, Two Gardens, One Orchard with about half an Acre of Glebe Land, on the North side of the same, adjoining and abutting upon a little Close now in the possession of Mary Umpleby, widow."

The Land Tax valuation documents for 1910 describe the property thus….
“Vicarage         Gross value £45    Rateable value £36
Occupier/Owner  Rev.H.J.Peck (Freehold)
Stone and slate rough cast house, rather old, condition fairly good
Accom. Drawing rm. Dining rm. Study. Morning rm. Pantry. Kitchen (?___)
4 bedrooms. Dressing rm. Bathroom & W.C
Water obtained from a pump.
2 stall stable.Coach House. Chamber (?over). Harness rm.
Good garden with tennis lawn”
We have the advantage of some early photographs of the property including one taken from the air and in which the old bay window can be clearly seen.
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Link to 413
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(click photos to enlarge)

Given its status as the Vicarage until modern times, it is not necessary to describe its ownership history but its occupants are revealed by the census returns (to see them click here).

The Old Parsonage

(click photo to enlarge)

Link to 411