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  • Memorial Photos

    General repository for photos used in Preserving Our Past
  • Residents

    General Repository for photos and other data relatiing to Hampsthwaite Residents
  • PLOT No. ## Felliscliffe Chapel-of-Ease

    Approximate location of Plot at the Felliscliffe Chapel of Ease, Kettlesing, HG3 2LB
  • Hampsthwaite Village Room and COVID-19

    The Village Room Committee has taken steps to qualify the hall as being COVID-19 Secure as follows: We have conducted a Village Room Risk Assessment and made it available to all users. We have cleaning, handwashing and hygiene procedures in line with UK Government guidance We have taken all reasonable steps to help hall users keep safe from COVID-19 We have taken all reasonable steps to help Hirers maintain Social Distancing when using the Village Room Where people cannot keep 2m apart we have advised Hirers on the mitigating actions they might take to manage transmission risk
  • Hampsthwaite Community Room and COVID-19

    The Community Room Committee has taken steps to qualify the hall as being COVID-19 Secure as follows: We have conducted a Community Room Risk Assessment and made it available to all users. We have cleaning, handwashing and hygiene procedures in line with UK Government guidance We have taken all reasonable steps to help hall users keep safe from COVID-19 We have taken all reasonable steps to help Hirers maintain Social Distancing when using the  Community Room Where people cannot keep 2m apart we have advised Hirers on the mitigating actions they might take to manage transmission risk
  • Preserving Our Past

    The churchyard of St Thomas a'Beckett, and its Chapel-of-Ease at Felliscliffe hold within them a wealth of local heritage via their Memorial Inscriptions and Burial Records. Why so many infant deaths, what was happening in society at the time of burial, was there a war or an illness affecting the population? How many local families are represented there and are there any well known names - or not so well known but with an interesting story attached? Is the design of the Memorial interesting in terms of its art work or the language used?This section of our website aims to list photographs of all Memorials, together with their Inscriptions and Church Records so that such questions may be answered by browsing or searching both now and in the foreseeable future - even long after some inscriptions may have faded beyond readability.
  • Bell

    Plot No. 3043 John Bell 1764 -1833 Plot No. 3148 William Bell 1811-1879Elizabeth Bell 1811 - 1860 Plot No. 3148 Maria Bell 1845 -1845Hannah Bell 1846 - 1860 Click on images to enlarge  Inscription  Inscription  Inscription Herelieth the body of JohnBell of Birstwith who de-parted this life the 1st of September 1833 aged69 years INLOVING MEMORYOFWILLIAM BELLBORN 3RD JUNE 1811,DIED 4TH JULY 1879ALSOELIZABETH,WIFE OF THE ABOVE,BORN 14TH JANY 1811,DIED 10TH MARCH 1860 IN LOVING MEMORYOF MARIA BELLBORN 3RD FEBY 1845DIED 11TH FEBY 1845ALSOHANNAH BELL BORN 18TH AUG 1846DIED 16TH JANY 1860
  • Lupton

    Plot No. 109 Ann Lupton  1784 - 1858 Plot No. 110 William Lupton 1775  - 1859 Click on images to enlarge Inscription Inscription IN MEMORY OFANN LUPTONof Hampsthwaitewho Died December 3rd 1858Aged 74 Years. In Memory ofWILLIAM LUPTON OF HAMPSTHWAITEWHO DIED JULY 18TH 1859AGED 84 YEARSLo! the prisoner is releasedLightened of his fleshly loadWhere the weary are at restHe is gather’d in to God!Lo! the pain of life is past,All his warfare now is o’er.Death and hell behind are cast,Grief and suffering are no more.
  • Watson

    Plot No. 61 Mary Hannah Watson 1863 -1931George Watson 1763 - 1846Henry Watson 1892 -1963Charles Watson 1893 -1918William Watson 1890 - 1891 Plot No. 81 Thomas Watson 1825 -1909Sarah Watson 1824 - 1899 Click on images to enlarge Inscription Inscription IN LOVING MEMORY OFMARY HANNAH WATSONDIED 1931 AGE 68ALSO HER HUSBANDGEORGEDIED 1946 AGE 83AND THEIR SONSHENRYDIED 27TH JAN.1963 AGE 71CHARLESDIED 23RD OCT. 1918 AGE 25WILLIAMDIED 14TH APR. 1891 AGE 1 In Loving Memory oTHOMAS WATSONOF FELLISCLIFFEWHO DIED MARCH 10TH 1909IN HIS 78TH YEARALSO OF SARAH WIFE OFTHE ABOVE WHO DIED DECEMBER 4TH 1899IN HER 75TH YEAR"SWEET REST AT LAST"
  • Smith

    Plot No. 3001 Edward Smith 1769 -1869Sarah Smith 1782 -1868Sarah Smith 1824 -1844 Click on images to enlarge Inscription  Thy will be doneSACREDTO THE MEMORY OFEDWARD SMITH,OF FELLISCLIFFE WHO DIED NOVEMBER 29th 1869AGED 100 YEARSALSO 6 FEET TO THE WEST SIDE OF THIS STONELIETH SARAH, THE WIFEOF THE ABOVE WHO DIED DECEMBER 3rd 1868AGED 86 YEARSALSO SARAH, DAUGHTEROF THE ABOVE WHO DIED MAY 24th 1844AGED 20 YEARS
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Manor Farm House

Link to 389

(click photo to enlarge)

In this present-day photograph it is possible to discern the farming origins of the buildings now called The Manor Farm House. The left hand portion is clearly a conversion of a former barn. An old aerial photograph makes the former history and use very clear.

Link to 382

(click photo to enlarge)

The house is one of Hampsthwaite's Grade II listed structures and is described thus . . . . . "House. Early C19. Coursed squared gritstone, grey slate roof. 2 storeys, 2 bays. Quoins. Half-glazed 4-panel door to right of centre in gabled porch; 4-pane sashes in plain stone surrounds with projecting sills throughout. Shaped kneelers, gable copings, end corniced stacks. Included for group value."

That last sentence reveals the listing to be justified by the house's contribution to the group of buildings amongst which it stands.

Writing in 1871, William Grainge ("Harrogate and the Forest of Knaresborough") says . . . . .

"In the field called the Hall Garth, adjoining the village on the west, are traces as if some important building had formerly stood there. The name also is suggestive of some such erection. The farm to which it belongs is sometimes called the Manor Farm; it is of freehold tenure, and was purchased by the late Mr. B.J.Wilson from C.H.Elsley, Esq., late Recorder of York. These lands at one time belonged to the Priory of St. Robert's of Knaresborough. In 1869, this farm was purchased by William Sheepshanks, Esq., of Leeds and Harrogate, the present owner."

The Ordnance Survey Map of 1891 shows the farmhouse and its outbuildings under the name "Manor House Farm" but the 1853 map calls it "Hall Garth Farm".

Given its proximity to the parish church and to the adjacent parsonage there can be little doubt about the farmland's early ownership by St. Robert's Priory but Grainge's statement about ownership at the time he was writing may not be quite accurate. According to the records at the West Riding Deeds Registry a substantial amount of land in Hampsthwaite had been awarded in the 1770s on the Inclosure of the Forest of Knaresborough to the Reverend Gregory Elsley. His successor, the Reverend Heneage Elsley was party in 1829 to a Lease and Release with Bilton Josephus Wilson (see the entry for Thimbleby House in Church Lane) and one Mathew Thackray - that deed specifically described the Manor Farmhouse and its outbuildings and fields in these terms . . . . .

"the Manor or reputed manor of Hampsthwaite in the County of York and all that messuage or farmhouse called the Manor House with the outbuildings, foldyard (?), gardens and stackyard thereto belonging and containing by admeasurement with the sites of the buildings two roods and twenty seven perches And also all those several closes or parcels of arable meadow and pasture land adjoining the said messuage and premises called by the several names and containing by admeasurement the respective quantities hereinafter mentioned be the same or any of them more or less or otherwise called or known that is to say Well Garth two roods and nine perches Church Croft seven acres two roods and seven perches the new High Pasture and Thirstly Field now in one close fourteen acres one rood and nine perches The Brackenbridge Wood or Plantation four acres and thirty three perches the Calf House Hill and Far High Pasture now in one close called the Horse Pasture adjoining Tang Beck ten acres three roods and seventeen perches Hebden Pasture five acres one rood six perches the Far White Field five acres thirty five perches the near White Field six acres two roods and twenty seven perches Long Aynham six acres and twenty eight perches Broke Bank six acres and thirty three perches the Great Close ten acres three roods and twenty five perches and the High Close seven acres one rood and thirty five perches.."

It has to be surmised that this deed was that under which Bilton Wilson acquired the land and when the next transaction appears in the records on 6th April 1870 involving an apparent disposal of this and other property to the Reverend Thomas Sheepshanks by the Reverend John Grisedale, Thomas Sanders and William Pollock that those three gentlemen were the executors of the will of Bilton Wilson who had died in 1866.

On the 8th November 1922 the farmhouse and its lands were conveyed by William Sheepshanks (son of Thomas who, presumably, had died in the meantime) to Frederick Alfred Aykroyd of Birstwith Hall. The deed gives a good description of the extent of the property which is said to include enclosures (as numbered on the 1909 Map) 326/322/280/282/283/284/286/279 (and 270 then in one)/281/264/260/285/259 (allotments) 269/265/263/262/ and 267 all of which were also delineated on the plan annexed to the conveyance.

On the 8th October 1936 Sir (as he then was) Frederick conveyed the property (and substantial other property) to the Tang Estates.

Here are two old views of the farmhouse taken from early postcards.

Link to 387
Link to 388

(click photo to enlarge)

Click here for extracts from early census returns

Manor Farm House

(click photo to enlarge)

Link to 389