Recent articles

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    "The general management and control of the Trust Premises and the Arrangements for their use shall be vested in a Committee of Management (hereinafter called “the Committee”) consisting of not more than Twenty-five members (exclusive of members co-opted . . . )" and "All members of the Committee shall retire annually at the Annual General Meeting". Extracts from Conveyance No.8791 dated 24th April 1953
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    Harrogate Borough Council is currently preparing a new Local Plan which will set out how the district should grow and develop to 2035.Previous iterations of their proposals and supporting documents are listed below with particular reference to their impact on Hampsthwaite. Link to HBC's Online Planning Application Information (opens in a new window) Click on Images or Headings to link to related articles
  • HARROGATE DISTRICT LOCAL PLAN

    Harrogate Borough Council is currently preparing a new Local Plan which will set out how the district should grow and develop to 2035.Previous iterations of their proposals and supporting documents are listed below with particular reference to their impact on Hampsthwaite. Link to HBC's Online Planning Application Information (opens in a new window) Link to Harrogate District Draft Local Plan Additional Sites consultation 14 July - 25 August 2017 (opens in a new window) Click on Images or Headings to link to related articles
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  • Barkers Family History

    Images for Barker Family History Article
  • BARKER Family History

    Descendants of John and Grace BarkerbyShaun L Wilson – February 2017 Barker families have resided in Hampsthwaite since the early seventeenth century and were extensive in the area during the nineteenth century. From the 1881 England Census for Hampsthwaite taken on 3rd April that year, Barker was the most popular name totalling 57 out of 457 people enumerated – 12.5% of those recorded living in Hampsthwaite at the time of that census. From the registers of Hampsthwaite parish, Barkers were in existence as early as 1610. The earliest Barker mentioned is John Barker, son of Peter who was baptised on 17th March that year.Where Hampsthwaite is mentioned in this article it refers to both village and parish. We will never know exactly where the early Barker’s dwelling houses were as they are not recorded in either the parish registers or on the early census returns, but it is assumed that they lived in the village or within the parish. It was not until the England Census of 1911 that full address details were given together with the total number of children born alive to the present marriage of the head of the family.
  • Tom Wright reflects upon the Barker family in Hampsthwaite

    As far as I can ascertain there were no Barkers in Hampsthwaite prior to the 18th century. The earliest reference I could find was to the marriage of John Barker, a tailor, to Ann Messenger (daughter of William Messenger) in the parish church sometime near the beginning of the 1700s. I don’t know from whence he originated.They had several children, as did all the Barkers, but I have only recorded my own direct ancestors. They were his son James Barker (1744) & Hannah Dousland; William Barker (1781) & Catherine Swale; John Barker (1810) & Mary Nutter; George Barker (1845) & Sarah ???  who themselves produced Rowland Barker and siblings. He married Eliza Jackson (from an even older family in Birstwith) and they were my maternal Grandparents.(See also and )
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Joiners Arms

Village folklore recalls three public houses as having existed in the village and this accords with early licensing records which reveal in the late 1700s the grant of three licences in the area. The licensees are named but not the premises. Nevertheless, those houses appear to be the Bay Horse Inn at Swincliffe, the Lamb Inn in Church Lane and the Joiner's Arms. How early those houses were established cannot be precisely stated but it may be assumed that the Joiner's Arms has a long history. The Inclosure Map for the 1770s appears to show a building on the site and the house certainly figures on the first O.S map of 1853.

(click photos to enlarge)

"Joiners Arms following refurbishment July/August 2016"
"Joiners Arms following refurbishment July/August 2016"
Joiners Arms pre-2016
Joiners Arms pre-2016
Joiners Arms pre-2016 showing restaurant extension
Joiners Arms pre-2016 showing restaurant extension


Alterations to the building over the years leave few architectural clues as to age but the photograph above still reveals a stone surround for what appears to be a former door aperture. The symmetry which such a doorway would have with the present entrance raises the possibility that the building may have been formed from a pair of cottages.

Compare the colour photographs above taken in more recent times, with this early photograph showing still the adjacent cottage(s) before the restaurant extension was built.

Link to http://archive.hampsthwaite.org.uk/history/images/1000/OldJoiners1000.jpg

Bernard Wilson (Book One - "Villager's Reminiscences") talking of brick built structures in the village said . . .

"The only other little bit of brickwork was between the Joiner's Arms and the Post Office: there were four cottages there, of which two were knocked down and replaced by a brick building."

Looking at the early photograph it seems that Bernard's memory misled him - the photograph was obviously taken before he was born (1919) and it reveals not two residual cottages but a single dwelling [note how the modern photograph above shows the extension to the public house (its restaurant) built in front of the old dwellinghouse - the rest of which is now also incorporated into the public house]. On the other hand, it may be that early deeds support Bernard's view. On the 24th June 1868 William Briggs Metcalfe, a Brewer of Harrogate, conveyed to George Metcalfe (his brother?) of Castlestead, Pateley Bridge, a Flax-spinner, his one-half share in "the messuage tenement or dwellinghouse now and heretofore used as an inn with the barns stables and orchard or garth thereunto adjoining and belonging . . . formerly in the occupation of Richard Warriner Cooper afterwards of Robert Wardman but now of William Atkinson and also of and in those three dwellinghouses or tenements formerly in two dwellinghouses . . . formerly in the occupation of Peter Barker Ann Gill and Peter Barker but now in the occupation of Emanuel Barker Mark Barker and Charles Malthouse". The wording suggests that the earlier history of the number of dwellings was correctly understood by Bernard.

In the conveyance of 1868 George Metcalfe is described as a Flax Spinner and it may be that it was the acquisition of the Joiner's Arms which set him on the path of becoming a brewer. Certainly, by 1897, that is what he became for on the 15th January in that year we find him so described when he conveys to John Metcalfe & Son Ltd a host of properties connected to the brewing industry. The Company may have already existed (was "John" the name of his father?) or may have been created for the purpose of better managing the extensive property holdings which George now had. The Conveyance not only transferred the Joiner's Arms to the Company but also the Nidderdale Brewery, Chews Buildings, The Crown Hotel, The King's Arms, Church Field and gardens, Hawkridge House, The Black Bull and cottages, Well House, the Talbot Hotel and Colbeck House and Cross Keys all at Pateley Bridge and also the Birch Inn at Wilsill, the Nidd Valley Brewery at Bewerley and the Queen's Head at Kirby Malzeard.

Link to http://archive.hampsthwaite.org.uk/history/images/1000/Joiners1940s1-1000.jpg

Joiners Arms in the 1940's

The Joiner's Arms remained in the ownership of John Metcalfe & Son Ltd until sold on the 4th June 1909 to John Smith's Tadcaster Brewery Co. Ltd. which continues to own the property to this day. The sum paid was £1200 and for that the purchaser acquired not only the public house and its associated buildings but also a one-acre plot of land on its south side and the field lying on the east side of High Street and which later became the site of the Memorial Hall (click here to read about the Hall).

Also included in the sale was the dwellinghouse which once stood behind the Old Post Office (click here to read about that dwelling) and which was demolished with the Post Office when the road was widened in the 1930s . . .

Like other public houses, the Joiner's Arms has played an important part in the social life of the village and, whilst Hampsthwaite's two other Inns have long since reverted to domestic use, it, happily, continues to do so.

http://archive.hampsthwaite.org.uk/history/images/1000/Joiners1940s2-1000.jpg
Mrs Ellen M. I’Anson – licensee for 20 years until November 1952 (photographed 1946)
Mrs Ellen M. I’Anson – licensee for 20 years until November 1952 (photographed 1946)

Joiners Arms

Village folklore recalls three public houses as having existed in the village and this accords with early licensing records which reveal in the late 1700s the grant of three licences in the area. The licensees are named but not the premises. Nevertheless, those houses appear to be the Bay Horse Inn at Swincliffe, the Lamb Inn in Church Lane and the Joiner's Arms. How early those houses were established cannot be precisely stated but it may be assumed that the Joiner's Arms has a long history. The Inclosure Map for the 1770s appears to show a building on the site and the house certainly figures on the first O.S map of 1853.

(click photos to enlarge)

"Joiners Arms following refurbishment July/August 2016"
"Joiners Arms following refurbishment July/August 2016"