Recent articles

  • Preserving Our Past

    The churchyard of St Thomas a'Beckett, and its Chapel-of-Ease at Felliscliffe hold within them a wealth of local heritage via their Memorial Inscriptions and Burial Records. Why so many infant deaths, what was happening in society at the time of burial, was there a war or an illness affecting the population? How many local families are represented there and are there any well known names - or not so well nown but with an interesting story attached? Is the design of the Memorial interesting in terms of its art work or the language used?This section of our website aims to list phtographs of all Memorials, together with their Inscriptions and Church Records so that such questions may be answered by browsing or searching both now and in the foreseeable future - even long after some inscriptions may have faded beyond readability.
  • Wiliam Bell 1811-1879

  • Wiliam Lupton 1775-1859

  • Thomas Watson 1825 -1903

  • Hampsthwaite Bridge - photo

    "Hampsthwaite Bridge over the River Nidd. Built in 1598, rebuilt 1640, alterations made in the 19th century. I have been wanting to photograph this bridge for a while now; today the winter light, the sparse vegetation and the mottled snow that remained on the bank of a feeder drain, were perfect."Simon HillJanuary 17th 2021(click photo to return to full article)
  • Previous COVID-19 Announcements

    Previous announcements and updates from UK Gov and ACRE
  • DT Forge

    DT Forge exists to promote good craftsmanship in a rich variety of materials, using traditional hand crafting techniques, supplemented by modern tooling and processes. Products range from original designs in high quality materials to artefacts made by sensitive recycling of iconic objects with the aim of extending their lifespan. "Making something out of the ordinary, out of the ordinary”
  • Memorial Hall and COVID-19

    The Memorial Hall Management Committee has taken steps to qualify the hall as being COVID-19 Secure as follows: We have conducted a Memorial Hall Risk Assessment and made it available to all users. We have cleaning, handwashing and hygiene procedures in line with UK Government guidance We have taken all reasonable steps to help hall users keep safe from COVID-19 We have taken all reasonable steps to help Hirers maintain Social Distancing when using the hall Where people cannot keep 2m apart we have advised Hirers on the mitigating actions they might take to manage transmission risk
  • VE Day 75 - Stay at Home Street Party - 8th May 2020

    Stay at Home Street Party - Decorate your House in Red, White & Blue and enjoy a picnic in your front Garden”.The village was bedecked in red, white and blue bunting (see also a short video taken by resident Charles Charlesworth on the Hampsthwaite Memorial Hall FaceBook page)Teas were prepared by the local coffee shop, Sophie's.With sandwiches, sausage roll, cream scone and Victoria sponge. One recipient later declared it to be “As good as tea at the Ritz”. A VE day quiz was also distributed with each tea.A group of volunteers distributed the teas, one came appropriately dressed in an outfit from the 1940s
  • Frank and Peggy Shuffe - Licensees at the Joiners Arms 1956-1977

    Frank Shuffe, the from 1956, was an English professional footballer who played as a right back for Bradford City and later became trainer at Valley Parade.On leaving football he became manager of the The Prospect Hotel at Ecckeshill, Bradford during October 1953 before moving on to become Landlord of the Joiner's Arms in 1956 Frank died at Harrogate Hospital on 7 February 1973 after a short illness aged 55. Peggy continued on with their son John, a keen sportsman, until she retired in 1978 and moved to live near friends in Scotland  
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Staying Safe Online

The first priority is to ensure your computer is kept up to date and is well protected with regularly updated anti-virus software. Also don’t store your banking passwords on your computer and change passwords regularly - just in case

Beyond that, staying safe online is largely a matter of being careful what you click on and what you plug into your computer or connect it to. Malware (a general term for all kinds of ‘malicious software’) can only enter a computer via:

  • an email attachment,
  • by being downloaded from a website
  • via connection with an infected device or system - e.g. a USB stick or a compromised network such as in a public cyber cafe.

Passwords

We are all, apparently, getting better at creating passwords but around 25% of us still use passwords such as: 'password', 'letmein', '123456', 'trustno1' or 'querty' for example (see The 25 Most Popular Passwords of 2014).

It is as important as ever, however, to create safe passwords (but ones which you can remember!). Consider one for general use and another for secure personal use. Check strength of passwords at https://howsecureismypassword.net/ (but experiment with similar passwords rather than your actual passwords - just in case!). Try substituting letters for similar looking numbers or symbols.

For example try typing the following into https://howsecureismypassword.net/:

  • Password
  • Pa22w0rd
  • P@22w0rd
  • MyP@22w0rd

Similar variations could be created using a memorable word such as your pet's name or street where you live then applying a 'rule' (e.g. substituting certain letters for numbers or symbols, alternating caps and lower case, writing in reverse, etc.)

Alternatively, you could instead think of a memorable phrase then take the first (or the last!) letters/numbers to create a password - applying the 'rules' above also if neccessary.

e.g. "Password is one of the most easily hacked passwords today" would become:

P100tmehpt (and would take about 6 years to crack - not very easy after all!)

Using techniques such as this may not create passwords which can never by hacked, but for most purposes they will be strong enough - especially if you change them regularly and don't store any important ones on the computer.

For detailed information visit 'Email and web scams: How to help protect yourself' in the  MS Safety & Security Centre.

Email Problems

  • check if a suspect email is SPAM or a SCAM by pasting its subject line into Google
  • NEVER follow an email link to a banking site or PayPal for example - always type in the address yourself and go to the site directly to check.
  • If something seems too good to be true - it probably is!
Staying Safe Online

The first priority is to ensure your computer is kept up to date and is well protected with regularly updated anti-virus software. Also don’t store your banking passwords on your computer and change passwords regularly - just in case

Beyond that, staying safe online is largely a matter of being careful what you click on and what you plug into your computer or connect it to. Malware (a general term for all kinds of ‘malicious software’) can only enter a computer via:

  • an email attachment,
  • by being downloaded from a website
  • via connection with an infected device or system - e.g. a USB stick or a compromised network such as in a public cyber cafe.